Wednesday, May 7, 2008

5/7 Evening News

News Items
Clinton won't quit; Obama doesn't care
As Clinton declares intent to stay in the race, Obama campaign signals that he will move towards a general election strategy over the next month.

Clinton-Obama cash gap looms large
Clinton out of cash, aides say, giving Obama leg up in staff, voter outreach in upcoming primary states like Oregon and Kentucky.

The Day in Delegates, Super Switch
Obama won a superdelegate switch, the campaign confirms. AP first reported that Virginia's Jennifer McClellan had switched her support from Clinton to Obama.
Related Articles:
TPM:
Hillary Super-Delegate Defects To Obama

Obama Picks Up Three Superdelegates
The Obama campaign annoucned three superdelegates -- Jeanette Council (NC); Jerry Meek (NC) and Inola Henry (CA) -- have pledged support.

Senate Reaction to Last Night's Contests
As attention turns from state primaries to undeclared superdelegates in Congress, there were no bombshells today in the US Senate.
Related Articles:
CBS Horserace:
Some Superdelegates Bide Their Time, Others Swing To Obama
ABC:
Superdelegate Senators Assess '08 Race

Hillary's Problem with African Americans?
But how does a candidate claim to be the strongest and most electable nominee, when that candidate has very little support with some of the Democratic Party's most loyal followers, African-American voters?

Hillary Will Drop Out by June 15
A senior campaign official and Clinton confidante has told me that there will be a Democratic nominee by June 15. He could not bring himself to say the words "Hillary will drop out by June 15," but that is clearly what he meant.

Uncommitted Super-Del: How Could I Tell My Black Constituents I'm Backing Hillary?
The uncommitted super-delegates are rarely candid about this publicly, but one of the key reasons they feel pressure to back Barack Obama is that as elected officials, they are themselves dependent on black voters.

Hillary Meets with Superdelegates
She did not answer a question about whether she met with Chairman Howard Dean nor did she respond when asked if she received any new superdelegate commitments.
Related Articles:
TPM:
Hillary Huddling With Super-Dels In D.C.
CNN Ticker:
Clinton makes case at DNC
Politico:
Clinton tries to rally superdelegates

Pelosi: The race is not over
House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-California, said Wednesday the Democratic presidential race is not over yet and that it is still possible for Senator Hillary Clinton to win.

The Obama Camp Dials It Forward
On the day after, the senator's strategists and supporters defer a bit to any exit strategy his Democratic rival may choose.
Related Articles:
FOX:
Obama Camp Aims to Finish Off Clinton in Nomination Fight

Paper That Endorsed Hillary Calls On Her To Exit Race
The Washington Blade, which endorsed Hillary, calls on her to step out of the race today in an editorial penned by the paper's editor...

Obama's Next Step
In a conference call with reporters, Sens. John Kerry, Claire McCaskill and Amy Klobuchar, and Govs. Janet Napolitano and Deval Patrick, noted Obama's strengths and argued his case for being the strongest nominee.

Clinton's Path To Victory Slipping Away
Hillary Clinton’s chances of winning the Democratic nomination have become slim to none - and slim looks to be leaving town.

Obama fundraises off Clinton loan
Barack Obama’s cash-rich campaign has spent so much this primary cycle, rival Hillary Clinton has been forced to loan her own campaign millions of dollars. Now the Obama team is using Clinton’s loan — in an effort to raise even more money.

Feinstein to ask Clinton for her primary game plan
Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.), one of Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton’s (D-N.Y.) most prominent Senate supporters, said Wednesday that she will ask the former first lady to detail her plans for the rest of the Democratic primary.

More Calls For Hillary To Drop Out, But Some Congressional Backers Stand Firm
With the action in the presidential race shifting over to the super-delegates in Congress that the campaigns are fighting over, sentiment appears to be mixed on Capitol Hill as to whether Hillary should stay in the race.

Superdelegates await Clinton's next move
Feinstein, who described herself as "very loyal" to Clinton, said "the question comes whether she can get the delegates that she needs and I'd like to know what the strategy is to do that."

The Superdelegate Fight Goes to Capital Hill
Been talking to several House Democrats a.k.a. superdelegates this day. Bottom line: things are, for the most part, status quo in terms of commitments, at least for the time being.

Hillary: In 'Until There's a Nominee'
Hillary Clinton wasted little time reaffirming her intention to see the Democratic contest through, telling reporters that she is “staying in this race until there’s a nominee.”
Related Articles:
CBS FtR:
Clinton: Until There’s a Nominee, “I’m Staying in the Race”

Analysis: Democrats quietly send word to Clinton it's over
Apart from George McGovern, a plainspoken man who knows something about losing elections, not a single Democrat of national stature publicly urged Hillary Rodham Clinton on Wednesday to end her campaign for the White House.

The Down-Ticket Effect
The seat hasn't drawn such scrutiny simply because it might flip from red to blue. It's also attracting attention because the Davis campaign and the National Republican Congressional Committee have run ads linking Childers, who touts his pro-life, pro-gun credentials, to Barack Obama.

Obama Camp Urges Superdelegates: “Bring This to a Close”
After winning the North Carolina primary and losing Indiana by two points, the Obama campaign is feeling confident. Campaign manager David Plouffe declared that they can see the finish line and are now looking for superdelegates to wrap up the nomination.

Clinton Fights On Amid Doubts She Can Win
Sen. Hillary Clinton has loaned her campaign an additional $6.5 million of her own money, superdelegates are switching to her opponent, Sen. Barack Obama, and fundraisers and, even, many aides think she cannot win.

George's Bottom Line on Clinton for Veep
Is Sen. Hillary Clinton, D-N.Y., staying in the race to get the vice presidential slot? George thinks so.

Romney on Obama: the presidency isn't an 'internship'
Former presidential contender Mitt Romney increased his criticism of Democratic presidential candidate Barack Obama Wednesday taking direct aim at Obama’s experience, telling CNN’s John Roberts that “the presidency of the United States is not an internship.”

By the Numbers
A look at the popular vote and total delegate count following Tuesday's contests in North Carolina and Indiana.

Why won't superdelegates choose now?
Couldn’t the Democratic superdelegates just put an end to the prolonged Democratic presidential nominating struggle? How about today?

Delegate Schuler Goes to Clinton
North Carolina Rep. Heath Shuler is throwing his superdelegate endorsement to Clinton. Note that Shuler said he would back whomever won his congressional district.
Related Articles:
TPM:
Hillary, Obama Nab Super-Dels
CNN:
More North Carolina superdelegates weigh in

Ed Koch: Obama Is A Sure Loser, Clinton Should Fight On
As Democrats coalesce around Sen. Barack Obama, one of Hillary Clinton's must outspoken supporters is not mincing words: the party is walking needlessly and unaware into a general election buzzsaw.

Hillary Picks Up Another Super-Del
Rep. Brad Ellsworth (D-IN) is now backing Hillary, on the grounds that she carried his district in the primary. He joins Rep. Heath Shuler (D-NC), who also announced earlier today that he's supporting Hillary because she carried his district.

Limbaugh comes out for Obama
He has publicly urged Republicans to vote for Hillary Clinton to keep the divisive Democratic nomination fight alive, but talk radio host Rush Limbaugh said Wednesday it's Barack Obama who he really wants to be the party's nominee.
Related Articles:
Politico:
Limbaugh now supports 'weaker' Obama

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Polling Results
Election 2008: Wisconsin Presidential Election
The latest Rasmussen Reports telephone survey in Wisconsin shows John McCain holding identical leads over both potential democratic candidates. McCain tops both Hillary Clinton and Barack Obama by a 47% to 43% margin.

Obama’s Support Similar to Kerry’s in 2004
Barack Obama's current level of support among white voters in a head-to-head matchup against John McCain is no worse than John Kerry's margin of support among whites against George W. Bush in the 2004 presidential election.

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Commentaries
Will She Stay or Will She Go?
After Barack Obama's sizable win in North Carolina and virtual tie in Indiana, it's the question on the tip of every political tongue this morning: will Hillary Clinton continue her campaign--and, if so, for how long?

Obama's Clarifying Win: The Fly on the Wall Is the Wall
Barack Obama's triumph on Tuesday night was a victory over a wall that pretends to be a fly on the wall. For a long...

Blitzer: What would you like me to ask Barack Obama?
I will be sitting down face-to-face Thursday in Washington with Democratic presidential candidate Barack Obama. It will be his first interview since his impressive primary victory over Hillary Clinton in North Carolina and his narrow defeat in Indiana.

Race Is All the Clintons Have Left
Hillary Clinton, always ambitious, an over-achiever, tough, smart and resilient. And now on the edge of writing a truly ugly chapter for all to see.

Hillary, Barack, want my vote? Just $20 million, please
What will it take for a Democratic presidential candidate to win the support of California superdelegate Steven Ybarra? Say, $20 million.

Moving Forward
The Obama folks need to be very focused on gearing up their operation now. If the primary team needs vacations, fine, put people you trust into planning mode. This needs to happen now.

Can We Forgive Each Other? An Indiana Garage Sale Reminds Us Why We Will
We've been through a painful family feud, but this will be a tough general election fight. We'll come together. Too much is at stake for us not to.

Blogtalk: Should She Stay?
After a big loss in North Carolina and a narrow win in Indiana, bloggers debate the merits of Hillary Rodham Clinton continuing her campaign for president.

Obama's Clinton Dilemma
To be crass and point out the unpalatable truth, there isn't a lot in it for Hillary to back Obama in a more than pro-forma "going through the motions" fashion.

Pandering vs. Presidential
Maybe voters just became privy to the change that has been promised throughout Obama's campaign -- to disagree with your opponent's ideas while always affirming their humanity.

Big Rewards Await Clinton If She Ends Campaign Now
One of the most inviting is the near certainty that the Obama campaign would agree to pay back the $11.4 million she has loaned her own bid, along with an estimated $10 million to $15 million in unpaid campaign expenses.

Cafferty: What will Clinton do now?
"The campaign may go on but the contest is now over: Barack Obama is the Democratic nominee for president."

After the Primaries, A United Progressive America
The public is united on issues. The mandate for progressive change is being built. Conservative dead-enders are increasingly marginalized. Pity the poor candidate that can't deal with that reality.

The Bill Factor
Remember the old saying, "'tis better to have tried and failed than never to have tried at all"?
It doesn't apply to presidential politics.


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